Matchbox Cineclub presents CRIME WAVE

One of the greatest and yet most perversely overlooked debuts in English Canadian movie history, writer-director John Paizs’s Crime Wave announced the birth of a new genre in Canuck cinema – Matchbox Cineclub have unearthed a rare treasure and want to spread the Crime Wave love this Scalarama.

Crime Wave

John Paizs, 1985, Canada, 80 mins

Synopsis: Crime Wave centers around an awkward loner, Steven Penny, who turns out bizarre scenarios for colour crime movies. Steven wants to turn on the best colour movie ever, but he has a problem, he can only write beginnings and ends to his scripts. No middles! Living above a family garage in suburbia and befriended by the landlord’s ten-year-old daughter, we see excerpts from a number of Steven’s scripts, zany ideas based on get-rich-quick schemes. Finally frustrated by his creative block, he sets out for Kansas to meet Dr Jolly, the script doctor.

Format available on: DCP (tour) / DVD
When available to screen from: 1st September
Terms: $250 Canadian versus 35% of box office.
How to book: DCP tour: Sean Welsh (sean.m.welsh@gmail.com); DVD: Monica Lowe, Winnipeg Film Group (monica@winnipegfilmgroup.com)
Any logos/publicity requirements: DCP tour: Matchbox Cineclub, Winnipeg Film Group (quad poster in production, to feature all dates on tour).
Images / trailer / poster available? DCP tour poster in production; trailer in production; other marketing materials available.
Why should people book it: One of the greatest and yet most perversely overlooked debuts in English Canadian movie history, writer-director John Paizs’s Crime Wave announced the birth of a new genre in Canuck cinema: what cultural critic Geoff Pevere dubbed “prairie postmodernism.” Crime Wave’s recent restoration by TIFF debuted to a rapturous reception during Glasgow Film Festival 2017, presented by Matchbox Cineclub. “It’s a joyous, uninhibited film, with each frame fit to burst with visual jokes and ideas. Scenes resemble at times live action Far Side panels, delivering buckets of deadpan, obsidian-black comedy. If there’s a funnier Canadian film out there, we haven’t seen it.” (Skinny review) “This hectically inventive film’s high gag rate had the audience helpless with laughter… The film also had something that few films have any more; real charm, in spades.” (KILTR review)
Complimentary programming ideas? There are a number of excellent John Paizs shorts featuring his “quiet man” character, particularly Springtime In Greenland (1981). These are collected on theThree Worlds of Nick DVD and are also available to book via Winnipeg Film Group.