CINE[STHESIA] 13 – Symphony of the city

Visit Auld Reekie through the lens of John Eldridge with ‘Waverley Steps’, a day in the life of Edinburgh through the eyes of a Danish sailor. First screened at the Edinburgh Documentary Film Festival in 1948, it was inspired by Arne Sucksdorff’s portrait of Stockholm ‘Rhythm of a City’. Join us for some Edinburgh on the big screen in Glasgow!

CINE[STHESIA] 13 – Symphony of the city

Visit Auld Reekie through the lens of John Eldridge with ‘Waverley Steps’, a day in the life of Edinburgh through the eyes of a Danish sailor. First screened at the Edinburgh Documentary Film Festival in 1948, it was inspired by Arne Sucksdorff’s portrait of Stockholm ‘Rhythm of a City’. Join us for some Edinburgh on the big screen in Glasgow!

Getting started with the Moving Image Archive

Scotland’s Moving Image Archive has been collecting and preserving films since 1976. This event will introduce you to the archive and guide you through getting the most from searching our catalogue – so you can watch lots more films! All of Scots life can be seen: adverts, documentaries, home movies, promotional films, amateur comedies, educational programmes and more. Whatever you search for, you are bound to come across film that will interest and surprise you!

‘Nice Girls Didn’t Go To The Academy!’ Cinemas of Brighton Tour

Join The Usherette as she leads you through the town, evoking the Golden Age of the Silver Screen. The tour ends at The Melrose Restaurant approximately 7.30pm. The Melrose was formerly the Pandora Gallery, where the first films to be shown outside London were screened in 1896.

This year the tour takes place on The Usherette’s birthday so she invites all walkers to come along dressed as their favourite film character and/or join her for supper at The Melrose after (both optional!)

Supper at The Melrose – please book a table via the restaurant http://www. melroserestaurant.co.uk and mention ‘Alexia’s party’.

 

 

 

The Duke of York’s Cinema Tour

Visit Britain’s longest surviving cinema, the Duke of York’s, for a tour of this iconic landmark. The Duke of York’s opened its doors on 22 September 1910. After welcoming millions of audience members, witnessing many changes of ownership and surviving numerous threats to its existence and even possible demolition, it was re-born in the early 1980s as an arthouse cinema. It is now a Grade II listed building – Brighton’s favourite cinema and the country’s most enduring picture house.