Events

‘Nice Girls Didn’t Go To The Academy!’ Cinemas of Brighton Tour

Join The Usherette as she leads you through the town, evoking the Golden Age of the Silver Screen. The tour ends at The Melrose Restaurant approximately 7.30pm. The Melrose was formerly the Pandora Gallery, where the first films to be shown outside London were screened in 1896.

Supper at The Melrose is optional – please book a table via the restaurant http://www. melroserestaurant.co.uk

The Duke of York’s Cinema Tour

Visit Britain’s longest surviving cinema, the Duke of York’s, for a tour of this iconic landmark. The Duke of York’s opened its doors on 22 September 1910. After welcoming millions of audience members, witnessing many changes of ownership and surviving numerous threats to its existence and even possible demolition, it was re-born in the early 1980s as an arthouse cinema. It is now a Grade II listed building – Brighton’s favourite cinema and the country’s most enduring picture house.

 

The Duke of York’s Cinema Tour

Visit Britain’s longest surviving cinema, the Duke of York’s, for a tour of this iconic landmark. The Duke of York’s opened its doors on 22 September 1910. After welcoming millions of audience members, witnessing many changes of ownership and surviving numerous threats to its existence and even possible demolition, it was re-born in the early 1980s as an arthouse cinema. It is now a Grade II listed building – Brighton’s favourite cinema and the country’s most enduring picture house.

 

‘Nice Girls Didn’t Go To The Academy!’ Cinemas of Brighton Tour

 Join The Usherette as she leads you through the town, evoking the Golden Age of the Silver Screen. The tour ends at The Melrose Restaurant approximately 7.30pm. The Melrose was formerly the Pandora Gallery, where the first films to be shown outside London were screened in 1896.

Supper at The Melrose is optional – please book a table via the restaurant http://www. melroserestaurant.co.uk

The Duke of York’s Cinema Tour

Visit Britain’s longest surviving cinema, the Duke of York’s, for a tour of this iconic landmark. The Duke of York’s opened its doors on 22 September 1910. After welcoming millions of audience members, witnessing many changes of ownership and surviving numerous threats to its existence and even possible demolition, it was re-born in the early 1980s as an arthouse cinema. It is now a Grade II listed building – Brighton’s favourite cinema and the country’s most enduring picture house.